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10 Must Visit Attractions In Liverpool

By Chloe
15 October 2020
10 Must Visit Attractions In Liverpool

When you think of Liverpool most will immediately think of The Beatles and Liverpool Football Club and their famous Anfield stadium (one of the country's largest). There's also that unique Scouse accent of course. Liverpool is one of the most popular cities to visit in the United Kingdom thanks to its vast array of popular attractions to see. From Albert Dock to the Cavern Club, this guide has 10 of the most popular must-visit attractions in Liverpool that should be on everyone’s list, whether you’ve got one day to explore or more.


Royal Albert Dock

Royal Albert Dock

The superbly restored Royal Albert Dock was the first of its sort to be built in Britain. The impressive five-story block of buildings at its heart was once used to store cotton, tobacco, and sugar. These enormous Victorian structures are built around an arcaded walkway, their cast Tuscan columns once serving as capstans for moored ships. Today, these decoratively restored warehouses are home to luxury apartments, designer boutiques, restaurants, cafés, and museums. Royal Albert Dock is also home to a number of first-rate tourist attractions. These include The Beatles Story with its memorabilia, photographs, and films of the Fab Four; the International Slavery Museum, just yards from the dry docks where 18th-century slave ships were repaired and fitted; and the Border Force National Museum, which tells the story of smuggling and contraband from the 1700s to the present day. There is something here for the whole family to enjoy.

Radio City Tower

Radio City Tower

Wanting to find the best view in the whole of Liverpool? You’ve come to the right place. Head up the 122 meters to the Radio City Tower’s viewing platform. From here you’ll be able to enjoy a 360-degree view of the city and on a very clear day, you’ll be able to see as far as Wales and the Cumbrian Hills. The tower is open 7 days a week from 10:15 am to 5:15 pm with the last entry being at 5 pm. There are several nights throughout the year where the beacon is open later than advertised for visitors to experience night time views of the city. So be sure to check out Tower’s news column on their website to see if you can go up and enjoy the views of the city at night.

Tate Liverpool

Tate Liverpool

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The Tate is the cornerstone of Liverpool’s contemporary art scene. The venue was founded by Alan Bowness, who was Tate’s director in the ’80s. After deciding he wanted to open a so-called ‘Tate of the North’, construction began at a defunct warehouse in Albert Dock. Since opening in 1988, it’s become a major player when it comes to hosting major touring exhibitions. An acclaimed branch of the Tate Gallery, Tate Liverpool, has been established in the Albert Dock. The ground floor of the 'Tate of the North’ has exhibition halls and galleries dedicated to contemporary art as well as works on loan from the London gallery. This is the perfect activity if you’re exploring Liverpool on a budget as admission is free.

Walker Art Gallery

Walker Art Gallery

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Boasting a large collection of pieces by Italian, Flemish, and French Masters from the 14th century to the present day. The Walker Art Gallery is a must-visit for any art lover. Take a gentle walk through the gallery and enjoy the vast display of masterpieces by Rubens, Rembrandt, and Rodin. Its display of English painting and sculpture, particularly of the 18th to 20th centuries, is unrivaled outside London and features works by Gainsborough, Hogarth, and Moore. The John and Peter Moore Exhibition, an important display of contemporary British art, is held every alternate year so be sure to check out when it is on.

Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral

Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral

The striking design of this cathedral makes it a rather unique attraction to visit. Though the history of this cathedral is more contemporary than that of its sister venue at the other end of Hope Street, its gothic-revival architectural style makes it a standout feature of Liverpool’s skyline. Building began in 1928, although it wasn't actually completed until 1967. Around its cylindrical tower is a huge "tent." Two hundred feet in diameter, it rises sharply to a funnel-shaped drum that stands 270 feet high, making the whole structure look like a huge lantern rising above the city. It’s a great place to snap that Insta-worthy photo.

Birkenhead Park

Birkenhead Park

Take some time out to relax in the lush Birkenhead Park in between your visits to the other must-visit attractions in Liverpool. The park lies on the west side of the Mersey and is linked to Liverpool by tunnels and the excellent Mersey Ferry service. Near the tunnel are the ruins of a 12th-century Benedictine abbey with a chapterhouse, crypt, and refectory. The park was the first publicly funded park and opened in 1847. You can enter from one of the three entrances, with Gothic, Italianate, and Norman architecture. There is an ornate bridge and two lakes to relax by and it’s the perfect place to relax and enjoy the sunshine with the whole family. 

The Cavern Club

The Cavern Club

Whether you’re a Beetles fan or not, the Caven Club should be on everyone’s must-visit attractions list. Head to The Cavern Club for true Liverpudlian music experience. The iconic cellar has seen seven incredible decades of music; from The Beatles’ first performance on 9th February 1961 to the Arctic Monkeys pre-breakthrough gig in October 2005. The Cavern Club remains the beating heart of Liverpool’s legendary music scene and is not to be missed for anyone seeking the soul of the city. Check out the live music from mid-afternoon until late evening, seven days a week.

Liverpool Cathedral

Liverpool Cathedral

Also known as the Cathedral Church of Christ in Liverpool, this huge structure - designed by the same architect who created the country's iconic red telephone boxes. The Anglican Liverpool Cathedral on St. James's Mount was consecrated in 1978, although services were held here in the 1920s. The Cathedral is very impressive with its copper roof, red sandstone walls and a 330-foot-high tower containing a carillon with 2,500 bells. The largest of the bells weighs a mighty 4 tons. One of the highlights of the Cathedral is the magnificent 9,704-pipe Willis organ, it is one of the largest in the world.

World Museum

World Museum

Everybody loves a good museum, and Liverpool’s World Museum is one of the best in Britain. This attraction specializes in sciences and human cultures, with a planetarium, aquarium and various space exhibitions on rotation. It is great for the whole family to visit and it is completely free to enter so its perfect if you’re visiting Liverpool on a tight budget. Whether you’re looking to explore the oceans or the stars, a visit to the World Museum reveals millions of years of the Earth’s history through thousands of exhibits and hands-on activities.

Croxteth Hall

Croxteth Hall

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On the outskirts of Liverpool, you’ll find this charming Edwardian mansion. It’s a great place to explore with the whole family as you get a chance to see countless rooms filled with furniture and character figures representing both the wealthy owners and their staff. Be sure to strike a pose on the majestic central staircase. The Country Park is also worth exploring while you’re there. In the park, you'll find a real working farm where the kids can have a chance to interact with the animals. The park is full of pleasant walking trails and a delightful Victorian Walled Garden, so make sure you set aside enough time to explore it all.